EMANUEL ALEC ILAGAN


Indeed the state of all who are preoccupied is wretched, but the most wretched are those who are toiling not even at their own preoccupations, but must regulate their sleep by another’s, and their walk by another’s pace, and obey orders in those freest of all things, loving and hating. If such people want to know how short their lives are, let them reflect how small a portion is their own.

The Shortness of Life: Seneca on Busyness and The Art of Living Wide Rather Than Living Long

relevant

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I don’t like the descriptor “sexy”
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But as cellphones and then smartphones became ubiquitous, it became easier to capture a moment, and sometimes a feeling, with an image instead of a wall of text. As a writer, this might in theory make me nervous, but it doesn’t. I think language has some class barriers that image capture does not, and I like the fact that almost anyone can poignantly document their experience and viewpoint without having to learn how to compose a structured essay or write a compelling lede. Not because it’s easier or requires less artistry, but because if you can do it, an image makes an impression (or doesn’t) immediately. And it conveys so much more information so quickly. There are plenty of opportunities to lose/bore/turn off the reader in a written piece. With an image, it’s one powerful shot. Or a collage of images that tell a story impressionistically yet powerfully in a way that text technically can, but rarely does. On Photoblogging (Some Unstructured Thoughts) : Elizabeth Spiers (via photographsonthebrain)

(via mossfull)

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COMETS COMETS
BLAISE LARMEE
PURCHASE
davidhockney
It’s no surprise that as a virgo, all my favorite people are virgos
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gurafiku:

Japanese Publication: Nikkeidai Campus Guide. Motoi Shito. 2014
Toilet Paper Issue 9 Barthes be yearning
Torontisms like cortados and roti make it seem like I’ve always lived here
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😍
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But to reject any work because we feel that it does not reflect us in a shape that we can easily recognize—because it does not exempt us from the active exercise of imagination or the effortful summoning of empathy—is our own failure. It’s a failure that has been dispiritingly sanctioned by the rise of “relatable.” In creating a new word and embracing its self-involved implications, we have circumscribed our own critical capacities. The Scourge of “Relatability” - The New Yorker
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